GwtG 2022The Duke Comprehensive Stroke Center, certified by the Joint Commission, is among a select group of hospitals that meet the highest standard of stroke care in the United States. Originally named the Duke Center for Cerebrovascular Disease, the Center was founded by Albert Heyman, MD, in 1966 as a collaborative effort of the NIH and the Veterans Administration.

The Comprehensive Stroke Center is part of Duke University Hospital, which has received the American Heart Association’s (AHA) Get With The Guidelines®-Stroke Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award for the past four years. This award, the highest that the AHA offers, recognizes commitment to providing the best possible care for stroke.

Based in the Department of Neurology, the Comprehensive Stroke Center has expanded to develop affiliated programs and includes faculty from an extensive list of clinical departments, research laboratories, and university centers within the School of Medicine and Duke Health System. These include affiliations with the:

Research activities range from laboratory studies based on molecular biological approaches to neuropharmacology, neurophysiology, developmental neurobiology, receptor biology, cell biology, and behavioral recovery. The affiliated Multidisciplinary Neuroprotection Laboratories focus on understanding the pathophysiology of stoke and acute brain injury and to developing novel treatments.

Fellow Spotlight: Ahmad Zamzam, MD

In the suburbs of Damascus, where Ahmad Zamzam, MD, grew up, a local expression translates to English roughly to “Stroke? Don’t even bother with treatment.” Disturbed at the lack of options reflected in this phrase, Zamzam decided he wanted to make a difference. Now, Zamzam is acting as a “pre-tending” member of our stroke service as one of our vascular neurology fellows.

Duke Neurology Research Round Up, November 2022

This October, members of the Duke Neurology Department advanced the fields of clinical and translational neuroscience, contributing to 14 new peer-reviewed studies and one book chapter. Highlights from our recent research include validation of new automated measures that evaluate handwriting for dystonia symptoms, a discussion of the effects of blood pressure on head and facial pain, and a discussion of presentations of a neuroimmune disorder known as MOGAD.

Duke Neurology Research Round Up, October 2022

Members of the Duke Neurology Department contributed to 12 new peer-reviewed journal articles published this September. Among other findings, this research answered important questions about the use of telehealth to manage chronic neurological conditions, investigated an alternative therapy’s potential benefit for fighting ALS, and synthesized the latest research findings about the role of the immune system and infection in the genesis of Alzheimer’s disease.

Duke Neurology Research Round Up, September 2022

Members of the Duke Neurology Department contributed to 12 new peer-reviewed journal articles published this August. Highlights include a review article examining evoked potentials used for deep brain stimulation in Parkinson’s, the healthcare received by veterans with epilepsy, the optimal stroke treatments for patients with cerebral venous thrombosis, and other topics.

APP Spotlight: Kristi Kehoe, PA-C

Kristi Kehoe, PA-C had been interested in neurology since childhood, but didn’t settle into a specialty until after she completed her training and found a mentor in neurologist Howard Natter, MD. Kehoe was impressed by the complexity, dynamism, and eloquence of the field and has never looked back. In this week’s Spotlight interview, the new addition to our vascular neurology team talks to us about her work on Duke University Hospital’s inpatient stroke service.

Duke Neurology Research Round Up, July 2022

This June, members of the Duke Neurology Department contributed to 12 new peer-reviewed journal articles as well as two new book chapters. Among other findings these studies uncovered retinal differences that may one day act as early biomarkers for cognitive impairment, population-based studies that will improve treatment for stroke and other conditions, and investigations of hydrogel scaffolds as potential therapies.

Duke Neurology Research Round Up, June 2022

Members of the Duke Neurology Department contributed to 13 new peer-reviewed journal articles this May, advancing our understanding of how viruses that kill cancer cells may be used against brain tumors, the optimal treatments for various types of stroke, the origins of Parkinson’s disease, and more. Read the paragraphs below for summaries of our research from the past 31 days, as well as links to the complete articles themselves.

Hospital Neurology

Duke hospitals receive AHA’s top award for comprehensive stroke care

Duke University Hospital and Duke Raleigh Hospitals have received the American Heart Association’s (AHA) Get With The Guidelines®-Stroke 2021 Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award. This award, the highest that the AHA offers, recognizes commitment to providing the best possible care for stroke. Both Duke University Hospital and Duke Raleigh Hospital have received this award from the AHA for the past three years.

APP Spotlight: Kimberly Holzmacher, MSN, AGPCNP-BC

An eight-hour shift can be exhausting on its own, but for Kimberly Holzmacher, MSN, AGPCNP-BC, her workday is only getting started. As one of our newest advanced practice providers (APPs), Holzmacher typically starts work on our Stroke Service before 5 a.m. and often works until 8 p.m. or later. For this week’s “Spotlight” interview, Holzmacher talks about why she’s been drawn to helping patients with stroke since nursing school, how this work compares to working in the Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center, and the joys and difficulties of her job.